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Harper & Brothers Publishers; Hardback with black boards and gilt lettering on spine; Stamped "U.S. Government Property" "Circulating Library, St. Elizabeths Hospital, Washington D.C."  See pics.  It's a bit rough conditon but very readable and with a real story to tell.

 

Black Boy (1945) is a memoir by American author Richard Wright, detailing his youth in the South: Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee, and his eventual move to Chicago, where he establishes his writing career and becomes involved with the Communist Party in the United States.

 

The book begins with a mischievous four-year-old Wright setting fire to his grandmother's house and continues in that vein. Wright is a curious child living in a household of strict, religious women and violent, irresponsible men. He quickly chafes against his surroundings, reading instead of playing with other children, and rejecting the church in favor of agnosticism at a young age. He feels more out of place as he grows older and comes in contact with the Jim Crow racism of the 1920s South. He finds it generally unjust and fights against whites' and other blacks' desire to squash his intellectual curiosity and potential.

 

After his father deserts the family, young Wright is shuffled back and forth among his sick mother, his fanatically religious grandmother, and various maternal aunts and uncles. As he ventures into the white world to find jobs, he encounters extreme racism and brutal violence, experiences which stay with him the rest of his life. Meanwhile, the family is starving and suffering from severe poverty

Black Boy A Record of Childhood and Youth by Richard Wright

SKU: BS13g
$15.00Price